April 6, 2017

My Hassle with the Hospital about my Parkinson's Meds

On January 20, I fell, fractured my hip, and knew I needed to go to the hospital. I remembered hearing stories from friends with Parkinson’s disease (PD) about complications they’d encountered getting their PD meds on time while they were hospitalized.

I didn’t want any of those troubles, so I packed a secret stash of my carbidopa/levodopa (Sinemet) pills before heading off to Sibley Hospital.

This National Parkinson's Foundation video describes this problem well:


The video offers some startling  stats:
  • People with PD are hospitalized 43 percent more often than others in their age group.
  • When they are hospitalized, 75 percent of people with PD don’t get their meds on time.
  • As a result, 61 percent of those patients develop serious complications. 

The video explains that patients with PD must be vocal and persistent with hospital staff about getting their meds on time. Many hospitals haven’t adopted the Parkinson’s Foundation’s training programs to increase awareness about the importance of maintaining timely medication schedules for people with PD.

As is typical for most Parkinsonians, my Sinemet dosage has increased through the years, and now I’ve reached the maximum dosage as far as my prior neurologist was concerned. These days, I normally take two pills every three hours: at 2am, 5am, 8am, 11am, 2pm, 5pm, 8pm, and 11pm.

March 30, 2017

My Walkers and My Falls since the Hip Replacement Operation

In my last post, I detailed why falls by the elderly are ominous. All too often, they put a once-healthy individual on an inexorable downhill slide.

I fractured my right hip on January 20, making that day (also #45's inauguration) doubly depressing. I had a hip replacement operation at Sibley Hospital here in Northwest Washington, followed by a week at Sibley's Renaissance rehab center. Since returning home, I've been working with an excellent physical therapist.

Much of my time in rehab was spent learning to use a walker. Before being released, I purchased a walker like the one I used there. I had another walker at home that I'd occasionally used during last spring's shingles attack.

I live in a split-level house. I spend almost all my time on either the ground floor (living room, dining room, kitchen, and screened-in back porch) or the upper level (master bedroom and bath, office, and guest bedroom and bath). I keep a small refrigerator and microwave in my office now, and the closet has become my  pantry, stocked with groceries, juice, and bottles of water.

The lower level and garage of my split-level house were converted into separate living quarters for my Kathmandu family -- Nimesh, Bhawana, and their daughter Nivah, who just celebrated her first birthday.

My Two Walkers
The Renaissance rehab walker is pretty basic, and not really suitable for use outdoors. It stays upstairs, where I use it to move between bedroom and office. Here it is:


We added the basket in the front and hung a tote bag from the side levers.

March 27, 2017

Falls and the Elderly and Me

My recent fall -- which fractured my hip and led to hip replacement surgery -- has become a major concern. Most of us have heard stories like this: an elderly person falls and breaks something -- a hip, a wrist, an arm. As a result, a once healthy, independent senior begins an inexorable downhill slide.

The statistics support my concern. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related death, and the third leading cause of poor health among persons aged 65 and older.

Nearly a third of older people experience functional decline after a fall, and many confront psychological difficulties directly related to the fall. Among these psychological consequences are fear of falling, activity avoidance, and loss of self-confidence. Together, these consequences have been labeled "post-fall syndrome."

Not surprisingly, seniors susceptible to falls also face higher rates of hospitalization and institutionalization. Hospital stays are almost twice as long in elderly patients who were admitted because they fell. Those same patients are at greater risk for subsequent institutionalization.

One in four elderly people who sustain a hip fracture die within six months of the injury. Over 50 percent of older patients who survive hip fractures are discharged to nursing homes, and nearly half of these patients are still there one year later. Hip fracture survivors experience a 10-15 percent decrease in life expectancy and a meaningful decline in overall quality of life.

March 18, 2017

This Aged Drama Queen Becomes a Coverboy for the First Time

I've often written posts about my love for my DC neighborhood, the Palisades. But some call it Kent. The Palisades and Kent have the same geographic boundaries with one exception. The southern boundary of the Palisades is the Potomac River, but Kent's southern boundary is MacArthur Boulevard. As a result, Kent excludes the "riffraff" living in the homes between MacArthur and the river, many of which are assessed at less than $1 million.

In 2015, The Kent Connection, a fairly fancy monthly, began appearing in our mailboxes. It's funded by advertisers eager to reach potential customers in our upscale 'hood. The magazine runs stories with photos about people, places, and happenings in Palisades/Kent.

Someone suggested to the editor that she run a story about me and my long connection with the neighborhood. I've always preferred calling it the Palisades and viewed the Kent label as a somewhat elitist designation popular with realtors and others interested in making us appear upscale and affluent.

Any concerns along those lines quickly disappeared during my first meeting with Sarah Taylor, the magazine's director. Nothing elitist about her. Her background includes a seven-year stint as VP/General Manager of a classic rock radio station in Washington.

I was surprised when a photo of me with my home family appeared on the cover of the magazine's March issue. Nimesh, much more computer savvy than I am, found a way to capture some of the photos and text, below:
UA-20519487-1